Category: Film

DRIVING WHILE BLACK: RACE, SPACE AND MOBILITY IN AMERICA, A Ground-Breaking, Two-Hour Documentary Film by Acclaimed Historian Dr. Gretchen Sorin and Emmy–Winning Director Ric Burns

_________ While Black

Chronicling the riveting history and personal experiences – at once liberating and challenging, harrowing and inspiring, deeply revealing and profoundly transforming  –  of African Americans on the road from the advent of the automobile through the seismic changes of the 1960s and beyond. By acclaimed historian Dr. Gretchen Sorin and Emmy–winning director Ric Burns.
By Gregg W. Morris who is working on review.

Film Review: DAY RELEASE (FREIGANG)- A Palm Springs International Shortfest Nominee for Best Live-Action Short Over 15 Minutes

A hell of a story. Compelling. Picturesque, from the doe eyes of star Anna Suk playing with incredible finesse single mom Kathi (with a felony conviction) struggling to keep the nasty fates and cruel verities of life that have dogged her from being passed on to her wide-eyed son Patrick, played with aplomb by Patrick Schmidl.

Lineup for the 48th Dance on Camera Festival, July 17-20, by Dance Films Association & Film at Lincoln Center

This program travels the globe from Ireland to Argentina to Kazakhstan, and the festival will be presented digitally for the first time. Tickets go on sale Wednesday, July 1. For additional information visit Film at Lincoln Center at filmlinc.org, Dance Films Association at dancefilms.org, and follow tlhem on social media: @filmlinc and @dancefilms.
Gregg W. Morris

Palm Springs International Shortfest

Palm Springs Shortfest – JOSIAH nominated for the Best U.S. Short; explores Hollywood’s unconscious stereotyping. DAY RELEASE, nominated for the Best Live-Action Short Over 15 Minutes;story of a single incarcerated mother facing a grave deadline. THE LAST FERRY FROM GRASS ISLAND, nominated for the Best U.S. Short; story of a hunted former Triad.
By Gregg W. Morris

CANE FIRE – Hot Docs Film Review

Director Anthony Banua-Simon’s CANE FIRE has the soul of a searing polemic in the form of a sobering memoir about the tropical Hawaiian island of Kaua’i. It looks like a paradise of paradises. For the indigenous and working class people who make the tourist industry shine it’s as bad as the eighth ring of Dante’s hell.
By Gregg W. Morris

This Virus Kills Too

The Film Lab (TM) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization devoted to the promotion and support of gender and ethnic parity in film and television programming.

It also runs the famous 72 Hour Shootout (TM), an annual, high-profile filmmaking competition organized with the support of ABC, NBC, CrossingsTV, Time Warner, Asian CineVision, the Asian American International Film Festival and many others, through which it works to ensure that stories and voices too often silenced in mainstream media are heard, not just as whispers, but as SHOUTS to the world.

April 2020 72 Hour Shootout Q&A with Filmmaker and 72 Hour Shootout Coordinator Tyler Ham Pong – Via YouTube

72 Hour Shootout Q&A: The Isolation Edition – In this 1st Q&A of the 2020 72 Hour Shootout filmmaking competition season, run by the Film Lab for 16 years, the 72 Hour Shootout Coordinator, filmmaker Tyler Ham Pong, answers filmmaker questions about the competition … and in this time of a pandemic!
Enthusiastic review by Gregg W. Morris

72 Hour Shoot Out Competition Underway!
Another Reminder About What You Need to Know About What You Need to Know

A succinct reminder about the 72 Hour Shoot Out 2020: The Film Lab is partnering again with Backstage Magazine to support ethnic and gender parity in the arts through the Film Lab’s annual 72 Hour Shootout filmmaking competition, a global filmmaking competition for everyone from novices to established filmmakers. Because of the pandemic, making films where you are bivouacked, sheltered, quarantined (voluntary and involuntary), marooned – et.al. – can be the paths for great shooting.