Category: Film Reviews

NYC DOC Film Review: EXPOSURE (2021)
The intimate panoramic scope and breath of this sublime account of women expeditioners skiing to the North Pole makes for one of the most rhapsodic films in recent years.

“We’ve created a film that offers an alternative to, and reimagines, the traditionally male-oriented expedition genre – all while delivering ace character-driven storytelling. I believe that when women come to fully believe in ourselves, especially in the crucible of the natural world, it’s catalytic. We can take the reins, work across boundaries of all kinds, and lead a way into a future where we adapt, with compassion and equity, to the changing climate” – Director Holly Morris. Review by Gregg W. Morris.

SHADOW BIRD (SONSI) Film Short Review

Those on the lookout for films with the cinematic magic to raise their spirits during these COVID-19 surges should consider this mesmerizing hallucinogenic & hypnagogic tale by Director Sivita Singh. It can make you feel as if you are experiencing a loopy de loop of phantasmagoric proportions during these perilous days. By Greggory W. Morris

DOC NYC BOYCOTT Film Review – Part 2

Check out the video Q&A to learn a lot about what one would want to know about the attack on the right to boycott if one knew the right questions to ask to prepare for the right action to take. Part 2 BOYCOTT film review by Gregg W. Morris

FRIMAS – Short Movie Review

Kara, who lives in a dystopian country where abortion is illegal and the penalties are draconian for those who break the law, is desperate to get one, nevertheless, and that desperation has driven her to take risks that could get her imprisoned if not dead on a slab in an abortion clinic. She is willing to take any risk, face any peril – and she most certainly does in Director Marianne Farley’s foreboding but exquisitely made five-star edge-of-the-seat thriller. Is Dirctor Farley’s FRIMAS a prophetic foretelling of what is on America’s horizon because of TX SB8?

LAST NIGHT IN ROZZIE Film Review

A sublime piece of filmmaking about the horrors of traumatic childhood experiences by a filmmaker who, Caveat Emptor, makes sure you feel the pain. Writes Dr. Murray A. Strauss, Founder of the Family Research Laboratory at the University of New Hampshire, “The family is the most violent institution, group, or setting that a typical citizen is likely to encounter. There are exceptions such as the police or the army in time of War.”­ – By Gregg W. Morris

Straight No Chaser Film Short Review
A GOOD COUPLE

A 14-minute film short made with extra tender loving care, as if every scene was meticulously planned, down to the last nuance, down to the last surprise. The filmmakers, drawing on a well of creativity, infused imaginative scenarios of the everyday angst of lovee-dovee neurotic couples with a verisimilitude that syncs well with an other worldly cosmic finish. It’s that good. – By Gregg W. Morris

Film Short Review
klutz.

It was five-minutes, 38-seconds into this marvel of a film – melancholic yet tempered with cosmic bliss – when I experienced the first swell of an unexpected rapture, brought on by scenes of the spoken-word-like-rapping of Zowie pitching to publishers of adult books about a children’s book she wants published. Her main character may be the only character, and she is a girl whose superpowers are diminishing, and who frequently falls on the floor or to the ground like a klutz at certain moments in the time-space continuum. Audiences need to be ready to deal with otherworldly themes in this film. – By Gregg W. Morris

Film Short Review
I AM, 26 Minutes of Cinematic Ebullience

A female techie, Nigerian, living the life of a recluse in a remote German forest, on an evening jog inadvertently crosses paths with an android, also female, prostate and comatose on the ground – and decides to carry it home. Stunning cinematography … but there’s one hitch: The storyline is so ephemerally gauzy and byzantine, it’s as if the the filmmakers decided that the out-of-this-world cinematography was more than enough for their film – and left it to audiences to figure out a plot for themselves.
Review by Gregg W. Morris.