Category: Film

Late Breaking News.
ReelAbilities Film Festival

ReelAbilities Film Festival is the largest film festival in the world dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of the lives, stories, and artistic expressions of people with disabilities. Post-screening discussions and other engaging programs bring communities together to explore, discuss, embrace, and celebrate the diversity of our shared human experience. The New York festival is the launching pad for an international program and its selections run satellite ReelAbilities festivals in over 20 cities worldwide.

WITNESS INFECTION Film Review

Because human remains and “the pasquinade teeth of Vito Morelli” were somehow grounded into Tablioni’s famous meat sausage that everyone craves, residents in the California town, if not the state or the rest of the country, are at risk of becoming human shish kabobs and slop-sloppy Joes – and zombies.
By Gregg W. Morris

THE ACCOUNTANT Film Review

This sagaciously witty production serves as a reminder of the creative ingenuity that can make a short film as aesthetically sumptuous as a regular feature. In the course of 35 minutes, an important message is expressed subtly but in depth and through exquisite acting and the Oscar-winning plot.
By Entertainment Editor Anakeiry Cruz

The Who, What, Where When and How of the Spectacular Asian American Film Lab and Its 17th Annual 72 Hour Shootout Competition Celebrating and Empowering Voices and Stories Too Often Marginalized by Mainstream Media

Part 1

The Shootout creates opportunities for filmmakers of color, particularly Asian Americans, and women to demonstrate their talent, gain exposure in the entertainment industry and create positive significant impact on the visibility of Asian and Asian American stories and characters in film and television.
By Gregg W. Morris

THE LAST OUT Film Review

Eighty-four minutes of riveting cinematography. An edge-of-your-seat, bittersweet, smashingly lensed story about the fates of three young promising Cuban ballplayers dreaming of making it big in Major League Baseball in the States. Because of the U.S. embargo against Cuba, however, Cuban ball players like them who want to be signed to big contracts must leave their homes to try to establish residency in The Dominican Republic, Haiti or Costa Rica. This Caribbean rite of passage means players must trek the dangerous Central American migrant trail where bodies and atrocities never stop piling up.
By Gregg W. Morris